Up to 50% of people with severe asthma have high eosinophils in their lungs
Up to 50% of people with severe asthma have high eosinophils in their lungs

A simple blood test can measure your eosinophil count.

This test is often part of routine blood work, and you may have already completed one. Ask your doctor about a blood test for your asthma, especially if you:

  • Frequently use a fast-acting rescue inhaler to control your asthma symptoms
  • Wake up at night because of your asthma symptoms
  • Have had to take oral steroids for your asthma
  • Have had asthma attacks that required emergency care

These can be signs of severe asthma that is uncontrolled and could be e-asthma.

If you and your doctor think you may have e-asthma, it might be time to talk to an asthma specialist.

Respirologists and Allergists are doctors with special training on how to manage asthma. A routine blood test can help them identify people with elevated eosinophils.

 

Respirologist

  • Sometimes called a “lung doctor,” a Respirologist specializes in helping people with breathing problems such as asthma.

Allergist

  • An allergist specializes in identifying allergies and their triggers

Talk to your doctor

Download a checklist of questions to help guide a discussion with your doctor about e-asthma.

      

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Create a Lungprint to understand your asthma

Take a questionnaire that will help you and your doctor gain a better understanding of your individual experience with severe asthma.